Equanimity buddhism

Contemplation on The Four Sublime States 4.

Equanimity buddhism

A Muslim may experientially behold that everything happening is meant to be, and stems from the ultimate wisdom of God; hence, being a Muslim can therefore be understood to mean that one is in a state of equanimity.

Baha'i Faith[ edit ] The voluminous Writings of the Baha'i Faith are filled with thousands of references to divine attributes, of which equanimity is one.

Equanimity buddhism

Similar in intent and more frequently used than "equanimity" in the Baha'i Writings are "detachment" and "selflessness" which dispose human beings to free themselves from inordinate reactions to the changes and chances of the world. Humanity is called upon to show complete and sublime detachment from aught else but God, from all that is in the heavens and all that is on earth, from the material world and from the promptings of their own interests and passions.

EQUANIMITY: A higher state of happiness | The Mindful Word

Related concepts include faith, the concept of growing through suffering and being tested, fortitude under trials, dignity, patience, prudence, moderation, freedom from material things, radiant acquiescence, wisdom and evanescence.

Do all ye can to become wholly weary of self, and bind yourselves to that Countenance of Splendours; and once ye have reached such heights of servitude, ye will find, gathered within your shadow, all created things. This is boundless grace; this is the highest sovereignty; this is the life that dieth not.

All else save this is at the last but manifest perdition and great loss. It is a condition. I was thankful for the prison, and the lack of liberty was very pleasing to me, for those days were passed in the path of service, under the utmost difficulties and trials, bearing fruits and results Unless one accepts dire vicissitudes, he will not attain When one is released from the prison of self, that is indeed release, for that is the greater prison The afflictions which come to humanity sometimes tend to centre the consciousness upon the limitations, and this is a veritable prison.

Release comes by making of the will a Door through which the confirmations of the Spirit come. The confirmations of the Spirit are all those powers and gifts which some are born with and which men sometimes call geniusbut for which others have to strive with infinite pains.

They come to that man or woman who accepts his life with radiant acquiescence. This present life is even as a swelling wave, or a mirage, or drifting shadows.

Could ever a distorted image on the desert serve as refreshing waters? No, by the Lord of Lords! Never can reality and the mere semblance of reality be one, and wide is the difference between fancy and fact, between truth and the phantom thereof.

Know thou that the Kingdom is the real world, and this nether place is only its shadow stretching out. A shadow hath no life of its own; its existence is only a fantasy, and nothing more; it is but images reflected in water, and seeming as pictures to the eye.Introduction to the Buddhist four immeasurables: love, compassion, joy and equanimity.

Introduction to the Buddhist four immeasurables: love, compassion, joy and equanimity. True equanimity is the pinnacle of the four social attitudes that the Buddhist texts call the 'divine abodes': boundless loving-kindness, compassion, altruistic joy, and equanimity. The last does not override and negate the preceding three, but perfects and consummates them.”. True equanimity is the pinnacle of the four social attitudes that the Buddhist texts call the 'divine abodes': boundless loving-kindness, compassion, altruistic joy, and equanimity. The last does not override and negate the preceding three, but perfects and consummates them.”.

True equanimity is the pinnacle of the four social attitudes that the Buddhist texts call the 'divine abodes': boundless loving-kindness, compassion, altruistic joy, and equanimity. The last does not override and negate the preceding three, but perfects and consummates them.”.

Meditation: Sublime States: Equanimity (upekkha)

Equanimity (upekkha) Equanimity is a perfect, unshakable balance of mind, rooted in insight. Looking at the world around us, and looking into our own heart, we . True equanimity is the pinnacle of the four social attitudes that the Buddhist texts call the 'divine abodes': boundless loving-kindness, compassion, altruistic joy, and equanimity.

The last does not override and negate the preceding three, but perfects and consummates them.”. The English word equanimity refers to a state of being calm and balanced, especially in the midst of difficulty.

In Buddhism, equanimity (in Pali, upekkha; in Sanskrit, upeksha) is one of the Four Immeasurables or four great virtues (along with compassion, loving kindness, and sympathetic joy) that the Buddha taught his disciples to cultivate.

Equanimity is one of the most sublime emotions of Buddhist practice. It is the ground for wisdom and freedom and the protector of compassion and love. While some may think of equanimity as dry neutrality or cool aloofness, mature equanimity produces a radiance and warmth of being.

Meditation: Sublime States: Equanimity (upekkha)